Posts Tagged ‘yuan’

Up for the Presidency: Xi Jinping

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

The Chinese Community Party already released the voting result of who will dictate the leadership of China in the next five years. The country’s vice president Xi Jinping was chosen to take the presidency after Hu Jintao steps down from the office this March according to Xinhua.

Aside from being the Vice President, Xi Jinping is also currently the top-ranked member of the Central Secretariat of the Communist Party of China, Vice-Chairman of the Central Military Commission, President of the Central Party School and the 6th ranked member of the CPC Politiburo Standing Committee. He was the son of the communist veteran Xi Zhongxun and had experienced his part of struggle during the cultural revolution. He is a man known to have a tough stance on corruption and a frank openness about political and market reform.

The selection, which takes place every 5 years, was just recently deliberated with a list composing of highly recognized Chinese officials. Also in the same report, the other candidates who belong to the list are North Korean-trained economist Zhan Dejiang, financial guru Wang Qishan, minister of the party’s organization department Li Yuanchao, Tianjin’s party boss Zhang Gaoli, and the conservative Liu Yunshan.

But it seems that only those in the government are celebrating the transition of power. In an another article, the locals, most especially the young and educated, are infuriated because not even a touch of democracy is present in the voting. Only those in power are given the chance to select and appoint the leader, robbing the people of their say to the faith of their government in the next five years.

The recently concluded US election, wherein President Barack Obama was given his second term, also salted the wound of the Chinese. Democracy was proudly displayed on the event, giving a fair ground to the American citizens to choose on who will going steer the wheel for the next couple of years. In the same article, the Chinese people are also weary from shouts of reforms coming from the former upcoming candidates thus deepening the disappointment.

The incoming President Xi Jinping has a lot of tough challenges ahead and his character will be really put to test. The most pressing concern will most probably the real reforms in the system that the Chinese people are deliberately seeking. But achieving it won’t be a walk in the park because unrooting the habits, serving as a blockade for its achievements, is a messy process. Relationship with relatives and friends may be lamented in the process before the problem will be finally rooted out.

Stephen Stevenson